Monday, January 9, 2017

Award for Curatorial Excellence--call for Nominations

Please spread the word about this new award; if you know a worthy exhibition/curator, make sure to send in a nomination. 

***DEADLINE: February 6, 2017

The Arts Council of the African Studies Association (ACASA) has initiated new Awards for Curatorial Excellence, which will be granted for the first time at the Triennial Symposium in Ghana.  The deadline for applications is FEBRUARY 6, 2017.  If you have organized an exhibition of African or African Diaspora art in the last three years, please consider submitting an application.  If you’ve seen an outstanding exhibition, please urge the curators to submit an application.  To be eligible, exhibitions must have been on view between September 1, 2013 and August 30, 2016.  Exhibitions opening after August 30, 2016 will be eligible for the awards at the 2020 Triennial.  The full description of the awards, and the materials needed for the application, can be found on the ACASA website at http://www.acasaonline.org/awards-for-curatorial-excellence/

Monday, December 26, 2016

Reviews of "Postcolonial Modernism" so far


Here, for anyone interested is a list, so far, of reviews of my Postcolonial Modernism: Art and Decolonization in 20th-Century Nigeria (Duke University Press, 2015):

·         Elizabeth Miller, “Worldly Affiliations: Artistic Practice, National Identity, and Modernism in India, 1930–1990 by Sonal Khullar, and: Postcolonial Modernism: Art and Decolonization in Twentieth-Century Nigeria by Chika Okeke-Agulu,” The Comparatist 40 (2016), 338-346.

·         Fred Smith. Review of Okeke-Agulu, Chika, Postcolonial Modernism: Art and Decolonization in Twentieth-Century Nigeria. H-AfrArts, H-Net Reviews. October, 2016.

·         Monica Blackmun Visonà, “Chika Okeke-Agulu, Postcolonial Modernism: Art and Decolonization in Twentieth-Century Nigeria,” The Art Bulletin, 98:2 (2016), 272-274, DOI: 10.1080/00043079.2016.1155906

·         Jean M. Borgatti, “Postcolonial Modernism: Art and Decolonization in Twentieth Century Nigeria. By Chika Okeke-Agulu.” International Journal of African Historical Studies 49: 1 (2016), 144-145.

·         Joseph L. Underwood, “Framing African Modernism: A Defining Decade for Nigerian Art,” Art Journal 75:2 (summer 2016), 94-97.

·         Helena Cantone, “Chika Okeke-Agulu. 2015. Postcolonial Modernism: Art and Decolonization in Twentieth-Century Nigeria,” African Studies Quarterly 16 no. 2 (2016), 125-127.

·         Rebecca Wolf, review of Postcolonial Modernism: Art and Decolonization in twentieth-Century Nigeria by Chika Okeke-Agulu, caa.reviews (January 28, 2016), doi:
10.3202/caa.reviews.2016.12, http://caareviews.org/reviews/2679

·         M. R. Vendryes, Choice: A publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries 53: 1 (Sept. 2015), 54.

·         Carol Thompson, Art Papers (sept/Oct., 2015), 53.


·         Tajudeen Sowole, “Postcolonial Modernism: Chika Okeke-Agulu Probes the Heart of Nigerian Art,” The Guardian (Lagos), Apr. 12, 2015, p. 34.

Sunday, December 25, 2016

Christmas

It is Christmas, Again
I hear no Angels sing
Just an old man, pissing
In my neighbor's yard

It is Christmas today
And I am blinded
by blazing light
Of the northern star

© Chika Okeke-Agulu (Princeton, December 25, 2016)


Sunday, December 4, 2016


The 6th Annual International Igbo Conference
Theme: Legacies of Biafra: Reflections on the Nigeria-Biafra War 50 years on
SOAS, University of London, April 21-22, 2017


Call for Papers

The Annual Igbo Conference has carved out a unique space, serving as a bridge between the community and academia. It is held at SOAS, University of London in association with the Centre of African Studies.

The ‘Legacies of Biafra’ conference seeks to explore the on-going impact of the war locally and globally, considering how the first civil war in independent Africa has influenced the perception of the continent internationally as well as its impact on the political and social structures within Nigeria. As 2017 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the outbreak of war, this conference will provide a timely reflection on the war as a watershed moment in contemporary African history.

The Nigeria-Biafra war sparked strong reactions from around the world. British participation in the war was informed by the desire to maintain the colonial entity that they had created, as Biafra’s declaration of independence presented a challenge to the legitimacy of African countries created during the colonial era. Global media coverage presented the first images of children starving in Africa, which became the dominant visual representation of the continent in the international press, and one of the lasting impacts of the war.

The conference will explore the consequences of the war, which include changes to Nigeria’s social and political structures, approaches to intervention in conflict zones and developments in humanitarian assistance. It will also explore trauma, internal displacement and the psychology of conflict resolution.


We are particularly interested in papers that engage with the following themes:
  • Christopher Okigbo and his Generation: Biafra’s Loss of Life and Talent
  • Women and Biafra: Women’s Contributions during the War and the Post-War Recovery Period
  • The War and its Key Actors
  • Trauma, Memory and Re-Membering
  • Biafra and the World
  • In the Wake of Biafra: Developments in Humanitarian Assistance
  • Biafra’s Child Refugees in West and Central Africa
  • Physical and Spiritual Displacement and the War
  • Post-War Religiosity and Narratives of Survival
  • The Ahiara Declaration and its Pan-African Vision
  • Britain and Biafra
  • Post-War Cultural Nationalism and the Shifting Margins of Identity

Organiser: Igbo Conference in association with Centre of African Studies, SOAS, University of London

The conference will be held in the Brunei Gallery Building, SOAS, University of London, April 21- 22, 2017.

Please send abstracts in an attached word file, and please do not use all capital letters when writing. Participants who require a British visa are encouraged to submit their abstracts as soon as possible. Please email abstracts of up to 300 words including the paper title, your name, current position, institutional affiliation (where applicable), email address and phone number to info@Igboconference.com and le7@soas.ac.uk no later than 31st December 2016.
Presenters will be invited to submit expanded versions of their papers to be considered for publication in an edited book.


Participants are responsible for sourcing their own funding for travel, accommodation and conference fees. For information on the Igbo Conference, please visit www.igboconference.com and www.soas.ac.uk/cas/events/conferences/igbo-conference

Sunday, November 27, 2016

Obiora Udechukwu: Line, Image, Text


I hear that this book is coming out before the year runs out. Waiting to see it!

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

On November 28, I will welcome two artist-scholars, Okechukwu Nwafor (Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria) and Evassy Tumusiime (Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda) to Princeton for a three-day residency as African Studies Association/ American Council for Learned Societies Presidential Fellows. On the 30th, they will be joined by Nomusa Mahkubu (University of Cape Town) for a mini-symposium on Art and Visual Cultures in Africa Today, before they all depart to Washington DC, to participate in the annual conference of the ASA.