Friday, March 6, 2015

2015 Venice Biennale: List of invited artists

MARCH 5, 2015

Artists Announced for 2015 Venice Biennale

The list of artists for Okwui Enwezor’s “All the World’s Futures” at the 2015 Venice Biennale has been released. The show consists of over 136 artists from fifty-three countries, and will feature a space for live programming in the Central Pavilion designed by David Adjaye called The Arena. “The linchpin of this program will be the epic live reading of all three volumes of Karl Marx’s Das Kapital,” Enwezor states. “Here, Das Kapital will serve as a kind of Oratorio that will be continuously read live, throughout the exhibition’s seven months’ duration.” The Biennale has also commissioned Kara Walker to direct a new production of Vincenzo Bellini's Norma(1831), which will be staged at La Fenice Opera House. The fifty-sixth edition of the Venice Biennale opens May 9 with previews beginning May 6, and runs through November 22.
Jumana Emil Abboud 
B. 1971 Palestine, Lives And Works In Jerusalem
Adel Abdessemed 
B. 1971 Algeria, Lives And Works In Paris
Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc 
B. 1977 France, Lives And Works In Metz
Abounaddara 
Founded 2010 Syria/Palestine, Live And Work In Damascus
Boris Achour 
B. 1966 France, Lives And Works In Paris
Terry Adkins 
B. 1953 - D. 2014, United States
Saâdane Afif 
B. 1970 France, Lives And Works In Berlin
Chantal Akerman 
B. 1950 Belgium, Lives And Works In Paris
John Akomfrah 
B. 1957 Ghana, Lives And Works In London
Karo Akpokiere 
B. 1981 Nigeria, Lives And Works In Lagos And Berlin
Mounira Al Solh 
B. 1978 Lebanon, Lives And Works In Beirut And Amsterdam
Meriç Algün Ringborg 
B. 1983 Turkey, Lives And Works In Stockholm
Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla 
B. 1974 United States, B. 1971 Cuba, Live And Work In San Juan
Kutlug Ataman 
B. 1961 Turkey, Lives And Works In London
Maja Bajevic 
B. 1967 Bosnia, Lives And Works In Paris And Sarajevo
Ernesto Ballesteros 
B. 1963 Argentina, Lives And Works In Buenos Aires
Sammy Baloji 
B. 1978 Democratic Republic Of Congo, Lives And Works In Lubumbashi And Brussels
Rosa Barba 
B. 1972 Italy, Lives And Works In Berlin
Georg Baselitz 
B. 1938 Germany, Lives And Works In Munich
Eduardo Basualdo 
B. 1977 Argentina, Lives And Works In Buenos Aires
Petra Bauer 
B. 1970 Sweden, Lives And Works In Stockholm
Walead Beshty 
B. 1976 United Kingdom, Lives And Works In Los Angeles
Huma Bhabha 
B. 1962 Pakistan, Lives And Works In Poughkeepsie
Christian Boltanski 
B. 1944 France, Lives And Works In Paris
Monica Bonvicini 
B. 1965 Italy, Lives And Works In Berlin
Sonia Boyce 
B. 1962 United Kingdom, Lives And Works In London
Daniel Boyd 
B. 1982 Australia, Lives And Works In Sydney
Ricardo Brey 
B. 1955 Cuba, Lives And Works In Gent
Marcel Broodthaers 
B. 1924 - D. 1976, Belgium
Tania Bruguera 
B. 1968 Cuba, Lives And Works In New York
Teresa Burga 
B. 1935 Peru, Lives And Works In Lima
Keith Calhoun and Chandra Mccormick 
B. 1955/B. 1957 United States, Live And Work In New Orleans
Cao Fei 
B. 1978 China, Lives And Works In Beijing
Nidhal Chamekh 
B. 1985 Tunisia, Lives And Works In Tunis And Paris
Olga Chernysheva 
B. 1962 Russia, Lives And Works In Moscow
Tiffany Chung 
B. 1969 Vietnam, Lives And Works In Ho Chi Minh City
Cooperativa Cráter Invertido 
An Artistic Cooperative Founded 2011, Based In Mexico City
Creative Time Summit 
A Non-Profit Organization Founded In 1974, Based In New York
Elena Damiani 
B. 1979 Peru, Lives And Works In Copenhagen
Jeremy Deller 
B. 1966 United Kingdom, Lives And Works In London
Thea Djordajdze 
B. 1971 Georgia, Lives And Works In Berlin
Marlene Dumas 
B. 1953 South Africa, Lives And Works In Amsterdam
E-Flux Journal 
A Publishing Platform Founded In 2008, Based In New York
Melvin Edwards 
B. 1937 United States, Lives And Works In New York
Inji Efflatoun 
B. 1924 - D. 1989 Egypt
Antje Ehmann and Harun Farocki 
B. 1968 Germany, Lives And Works In Berlin / B. 1944 – D. 2014 Germany
Maria Eichhorn 
B. 1962 Germany, Lives And Works In Berlin
Walker Evans 
B. 1903 - D. 1975 United States
Harun Farocki 
B. 1944 - D. 2014, Germany
Emily Floyd 
B. 1972 Australia, Lives And Works In Sydney
Peter Friedl 
B. 1960 Austria, Lives And Works In Berlin
Coco Fusco 
B. 1960 United States, Lives And Works In New York
Marco Fusinato 
B. 1964 Australia, Lives And Works In Melbourne
Charles Gaines 
B. 1944 United States, Lives And Works In Los Angeles
Ellen Gallagher 
B. 1965 United States, Lives And Works In Rotterdam
Ana Gallardo 
B. 1958 Argentina, Lives And Works In Buenos Aires
Dora Garcia 
B. 1965 Spain, Lives In Barcelona
Theaster Gates 
B. 1973 United States, Lives And Works In Chicago
Isa Genzken 
B. 1948 Germany, Lives And Works In Berlin
Gluklya 
B. 1969 Russia, Lives And Works In Saint Petersburg
Sônia Gomes 
B. 1948 Brazil, Lives And Works In Belo Horizonte
Katharina Grosse 
B. 1961 Germany, Lives And Works In Berlin
Gulf Labor 
A Transnational Coalition Of International Artists Founded In 2010
Andreas Gursky 
B. 1955 Germany, Lives And Works In Düsseldorf
Hans Haacke 
B. 1936 Germany, Lives And Works In New York
Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige 
B. 1969 Lebanon, Live And Work In Paris And Beirut
Newell Harry 
B. 1972 Australia, Lives And Works In Sydney
Kay Hassan 
B. 1956 South Africa, Lives And Works In Johannesburg
Thomas Hirschhorn 
B. 1957 Switzerland, Lives And Works In Paris
Carsten Höller 
B. 1961 Belgium, Lives And Works In Stockholm
Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson 
B. 1938 - D. 2014 / B.1938 - D. 1973 United States
Heung Soon Im 
B. 1969 South Korea, Lives And Works In Seoul
Invisible Borders: Trans-African Photographers 
An Artists’ Organization Founded In 2011, Based In Lagos
Tetsuya Ishida 
B. 1973 – D. 2005 Japan
Ji Dachun 
B. 1968 China, Lives And Works In Beijing
Isaac Julien 
B. 1960 United Kingdom, Lives And Works In London
Hiwa K. 
B. 1975 Iraq, Lives And Works In Berlin
Samson Kambalu 
B. 1975 Malawi, Lives And Works In London
Ayoung Kim 
B. 1979 South Korea, Lives And Works In Seoul
Alexander Kluge 
B. 1932 Germany, Lives And Works In Munich
Emily Kame Kngwarreye 
B. 1910 - D. 1996, Australia
Runo Lagomarsino 
B. 1977 Sweden, Lives And Works In Stockholm And São Paulo
Sonia Leber and David Chesworth 
B. 1959 Australia, B. 1958 United Kingdom, Live And Work In Melbourne
Glenn Ligon 
B. 1960 United States, Lives And Works In New York
Gonçalo Mabunda 
B. 1975 Mozambique, Lives And Works In Maputo
Madhusudhanan 
B. 1956 India, Lives And Works In New Delhi And Kerala
Ibrahim Mahama 
B. 1987 Ghana, Lives And Works In Tamale
David Maljkovic 
B. 1973 Croatia, Lives And Works In Zagreb
Victor Man 
B. 1974 Romania, Lives And Works In Berlin
Abu Bakarr Mansaray 
B. 1970 Sierra Leone, Lives And Works In Freetown And The Netherlands
Chris Marker 
B. 1921 - D. 2012, France
Kerry James Marshall 
B. 1955 United States, Lives And Works In Chicago
Helen Marten 
B. 1985 United Kingdom, Lives And Works In London
Fabio Mauri 
B. 1926 - D. 2009 Italy
Steve Mcqueen 
B. 1969 United Kingdom, Lives And Works In Amsterdam
Naeem Mohaiemen 
B. 1969 Bangladesh, Lives And Works In Dhaka And New York
Jason Moran 
B. 1975 United States, Lives And Works In New York
Ivana Müller 
B. 1972 Croatia, Lives And Works In Paris
Lavar Munroe 
B. 1982 Bahamas, Lives And Works Between Chapel Hill, North Carolina And Washington DC
Oscar Murillo 
B. 1986 Colombia, Lives And Works In London
Wangechi Mutu 
B. 1972 Kenya, Lives And Works In New York
Hwayeon Nam 
B. 1979 South Korea, Lives And Works In Seoul And Berlin
Bruce Nauman 
B. 1941 United States, Lives And Works In New Mexico
Cheikh Ndiaye 
B. 1970 Senegal, Lives And Works In New York, Dakar And Lyon
Olaf Nicolai 
B. 1962 Germany, Lives And Works In Berlin
Chris Ofili 
B. 1968 United Kingdom, Lives And Works In London And Trinidad
Emeka Ogboh 
B. 1977 Nigeria, Lives And Works In Lagos And Berlin
Philippe Parreno 
B. 1964 France, Lives And Works In Paris
Pino Pascali 
B. 1935 - D. 1968, Italy
Adrian Piper 
B. 1948 United States, Lives And Works In Berlin
Lemi Ponifasio 
B. 1964 New Zealand, Lives And Works In Auckland
Qiu Zhijie 
B. 1969 China, Lives And Works In Beijing
Raha Raissnia 
B. 1968 Iran, Lives And Works In New York
Raqs Media Collective 
(Narula, Monica; Bagchi, Jeebesh; Sengupta, Shuddhabrata) 
A Collective Founded 1992 India, Based In New Delhi
Lili Reynaud-Dewar 
B. 1975 France, Lives And Works In Grenoble
Mykola Ridnyi 
B. 1985 Ukraine, Lives And Works In Kharkiv
Liisa Roberts 
B. 1969 France, Lives And Works In New York, Helsinki And Saint Petersburg
Mika Rottenberg 
B. 1976 Argentina, Lives And Works In New York
Joachim Schönfeldt 
B. 1958 South Africa, Lives And Works In Johannesburg
Massinissa Selmani 
B. 1980 Algeria, Lives And Works In Algiers And Tours
Fatou Kandé Senghor 
B 1971 Senegal, Lives And Works In Dakar
Prasad Shetty and Rupali Gupte 
B. 1974 India, Live And Work In Mumbai
Gedi Sibony 
B. 1973 United States, Lives And Works In New York
Gary Simmons 
B. 1964 United States, Lives And Works In New York
Taryn Simon 
B. 1975 United States, Lives And Works In New York
Lorna Simpson 
B. 1960 United States, Lives And Works In New York
Robert Smithson 
B. 1938 - D. 1973, United States
Mikhael Subotzky 
B. 1981 South Africa, Lives And Works In Johannesburg
Mariam Suhail 
B. 1979 Pakistan, Lives And Works In Bangalore
Sarah Sze 
B. 1969 United States, Lives And Works In New York
The Propeller Group 
A Collective Founded 2006 Vietnam/US, Live And Work In Ho Chi Minh City
The Tomorrow 
A Journal Founded 2014 Italy, Based In Milan
Rirkrit Tiravanija 
B. 1961 Thailand, Lives And Works In New York, Berlin And Chiang Mai
Barthélémy Toguo 
B. 1967 Cameroon, Lives And Works In Paris And Bandjoun
Xu Bing 
B. 1955 China, Lives And Works In Beijing
Ala Younis 
B. 1974 Jordan, Lives And Works In Amman

Saturday, February 28, 2015

George Osodi and Hassan Hajjaj @ Newark Museum

Last evening, Newark Museum opened two photography exhibitions: George Osodi's Royals and Regalia: Inside the Palaces of Nigeria's Monarchs and Hassan Hajjaj: My Rock Stars. The Lagos-based Osodi has made a name in the international art scene for his documentary photography, whereas the UK-based, Moroccan Hajjaj is best known for his candy-palette, anti-ethnographic portraits of Moroccan hipsters. In this double exhibition, Osodi presents a new body of work, quite different from anything he had done previously--powerful portraits of Nigerian royalty whose stunning regalia and palace decor speak equally about their economic status, the weight of tradition, survival of peoples, and the surprising layering of material cultures required for the production of the spectacle of real and symbolic power of these ancient and modern monarchies. For his part, Hajjaj continues his portrait practice, in which mid-twentieth-century, pattern-intensive African photo-portrait styles collide with psychedelic--or is it electric Kool-Aid colors of the 1960s America. The rock stars featured in the present show are in fact musicians that, according to the artist, have been on some influence in his life and work.They are not the anonymous denizens of urban Morocco he presented in the well-circulated Kesh Angels series. More to say later. But, between these two exhibitions are some of the most impressive portrait photographs I have seen in a while

Anyways, thanks again to Senior Curator, Christa Clarke, and the Newark Museum for making shows like this possible in the North East. This is one more reason Newark remains my favorite museum in the area. Do yourself a favor, go see these two exhibitions. But if you cannot, and if you missed the opening, here are some photos:


All photos: Chika Okeke-Agulu



Senior Curator Christa Clarke and George Osodi

Christa, George and Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi (Dartmouth College Museum curator)

Perrin Lathrop (of Princeton) and Kimberly Gant (Mellon curatorial fellow at Newark)







Hassan Hajjaj (second right)


George with family and fans


Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Nigerian National Gallery of Art and the Abuja Biennale

In March of last year (2014), news came that the Nigerian National Gallery of Art (NGA) had established something it called the Abuja Biennale that would open in 2015. The whole matter seemed strange, if not funny, because I tried mightily to find some useful information about this biennale, and all I could find was announcement about the launching of the biennale’s logo! Nothing about the venue, exhibition dates, and any specific calendar of events leading up to the exhibition that was apparently only just a year away. What were these people drinking?, I thought to myself. But then, was this surprising? Unfortunately, no.

You see, the NGA, this vast government parastatal, with branches in, I think, all the 36 States of Nigeria has had a history of establishing projects that are at best questionable, at worse ridiculous—to the utter disappointment of those within and outside Nigeria who expect Africa’s giant to also live up to expectation when it comes to the business of art. Besides the embarrassing fact that the Gallery does not have a decent art space, that is to say real gallery, of its own, it has produced such underwhelming projects as something it called ARESUVA (African Regional Summit and Exhibition on Visual Art) and Art Expo, both of which were ramshackle art exhibitions even the most sympathetic critic would have been at pains to describe as befitting of the national art museum of any self-respecting country. Thankfully, both are now rested. And the current NGA administration seems to have stopped participating in the kind of fourth-rate temporary exhibitions overseas that I complained about some years ago.

In fact, the Biennale announced last year was meant to replace the ARESUVA established by the last NGA administration. And because the two editions of ARESUVA were such sorry attempts to present Nigeria’s own international art gig, its cancellation was good riddance. Nothing like the sense of loss most folks felt about the elimination of the Johannesburg Biennale after its 1995 and 1997 editions. Truth be told, I was quite thrilled to hear that the NGA had decided to kill off ARESUVA, since for me it was a badly conceived idea—something about using art to realize the goals of African Union’s New Partnership for African Development (NEPAD)—that could never have resulted in a serious contemporary art event. Moreover, the NGA did not seem to have any clue about what it takes, in terms of infrastructure and logistical support, to organize an exhibition that might feature any art worth its name, from within and outside Nigeria. Anyway, with the news about the inaugural Abuja Biennale, I thought that maybe finally, the NGA had done its homework, perhaps gone to Dakar to study how they have managed to organize Dak’art for the past twenty-something years. But that was wishful thinking on my part, as the information about launching the biennale’s logo quickly suggested to me that this was more likely Nigerian business as usual. It was clear from news reports that the NGA had not really thought about the Biennale model it wished to adopt, which would determine what kind of event they had in mind. Was it going to be based on national pavilion model, as do Venice and Cairo; or on curated/themed model as do Dakar, Gwangju, Havana, etc? And what about the idea touted by the NGA that the biennale would provide artists opportunity to SELL their work? Really? Since when did artists sell work at international art biennales? Or was the biennale actually a commercial ART FAIR, like Freize, Cape Town, Art Basel? Such basic outstanding questions about an event scheduled less a year away and for which we only had a mere logo? That's why it seemed to me that one could not possibly take the idea of a First Abuja Biennale in 2015 seriously.

So, when this past week I learnt that the Abuja Biennale is likely toast, no thanks, apparently, to the recent decision by the Nigerian government to merge the long-established national antiquities museum (the Nigerian Commission for Museums and Monuments) and the NGA, I thought, yep, how so sad, this open demonstration of disregard for the value of fine art, despite the achievements of Nigerian artists at home and overseas since the country’s birth in 1914. Although the merger should not necessarily imperil the biennale, if it was well conceived in the first instance, joining these two institutions all but guarantees that the decades-long clamor for the building of a permanent and befitting national art gallery or museum in Nigeria will not be heard by bureaucrats and politicians whose ears are completely jammed with fetid wax. And because the NGA as an autonomous parastatal has never quite lived up to its mandate and has virtually failed to meet the expectations of the Nigerian and international art worlds, if its merger with the more respectable NCMM means its further disappearance from our collective dream, one might not even miss it, just as I don’t miss ARESUVA.

Let’s simply stop thinking that the NGA or any national/state government institution will ever take the initiative, or play any important role in the development of real and functional art museums in Nigeria, or that it has the capacity to organize biennale-type art exhibitions, as Senegal, Egypt Algeria, and Morocco have done.  We must look elsewhere, to the still untapped yet increasingly robust private sector for leadership, to help change what remains a national embarrassment.

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

What's Goodluck Jonathan's Payment?

I am still bristling, as are many Nigerians. about the cynical, desperate attempt by the government of Goodluck Jonathan to remain in power, when seeing the damning and devastating writing on his wall, he decided to postpone elections there were scheduled a long time ago for February 14. We are told that the reason for the postponement is to allow the Nigerian military focus on defeating the Boko Haram terror merchants in the next six weeks. This is a government that has shown absolutely no interest and capacity to fight this menace; a government that stuffed its ears against global clamor for something to be done to bring back abducted girls from Borno State; a government that has allowed these terrorists take over vast areas of Northeastern Nigeria, while the president is busy fattening his friends with Nigeria's oil; a government that has more or less left the task of confronting BH inside Nigeria to neighboring countries; a PDP party that has shown such political arrogance that has done nothing but breed an unprecedented culture of impunity and official corruption; a government and party that deployed soldiers to states in order to rig elections. In fact it has become self-evident that the reason for the postponement of the election is that the soldiers the ruling party needs to rig elections are just now busy fumbling around the Northeast, playing hide and seek with the terrorists. Given the massive deployment of soldiers to Ekiti State last year, to help the current governor rig elections, as the Ekiti Tapes, now reveal, is it any surprise that the government will need most of the Nigerian army to replicate the same criminal feat in all the 36 states?
The elections have now been postponed for six weeks; but the questions for Nigerians is this: what should be Goodluck Jonathan and his party's payment for dragging Nigeria to the precipice, just to maintain the culture of corruption that is their legacy, and for bring nothing but Badluck? What will be their reward for the egregious attempt to damage the fragile democratic dispensation the viability of which is directly related to Nigeria's survival? Should he and his party be compensated with another four years in power? No, I don't think so!

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Santu Mofokeng Opening @ Th Walther Collection, New York


Santu Mofokeng 
A Metaphorical Biography


Opening Reception
Thursday, January 29, from 6pm-8pm

Santu Mofokeng, Eyes-wide-shut, Motouleng Cave, Clarens, from Chasing Shadows, 2004



Opening Reception: Thursday, January 29, from 6pm-8pm


The Walther Collection Project Space
526 West 26th Street, Suite 718
New York City




The Walther Collection presents a solo exhibition of photographs by Santu Mofokeng, bringing together seven remarkable series of poetic and resonant images by one of South Africa's most important artists. Drawn exclusively from the collection, Santu Mofokeng: A Metaphorical Biography features selections from powerful black-and-white photographic essays exploring landscape and social identity. Mofokeng's nuanced, slowed-down work resists the sensational, providing an intimate vision of South African communities, while his evocative landscapes consider memories of historical trauma. This exhibition, on view from January 29 to May 23, 2015, spans three decades of Mofokeng's career and includes numerous prints shown for the first time in the United States.
The Walther Collection Project Space
526 West 26th Street, Suite 718
New York, NY 10001 
+1 212 352 0683

Opening Hours:
Wednesday-Saturday, 11am-6pm


Thursday, January 22, 2015

Marcia presents "Grey" @ Susan Inglett Gallery, Feb. 5

Logo Susan Inglett Gallery



MARCIA KURE: Grey
5 February 2015 - 14 March 2015



Susan Inglett Gallery is pleased to present new works by Marcia Kure in her third solo exhibition with the Gallery from 5 February to 14 March 2015. A reception for the artist will be held Thursday evening, 5 February from 6 to 8 PM.

Inspired by her recent residency at The V&A, London, Marcia Kure continues to embrace abstraction and figuration through sculpture, watercolor and collage. Making a formal and ideological transition within the work, Kure pushes towards abstraction as a means of negotiating the hyper-realism of modern modes of communication and dissemination. In processing current events from natural to social disasters she addresses abstraction of the physical body through a variety of mediums that grapple with laws of nature and culture.

This form of figurative abstraction is seen explicitly in Kure’s fabric installations which are accretions of material puzzled together, formal arrangements that might mimic or behave like a body; an aesthetic leviathan. This broken or disintegrated body speaks to disappearance, fragments, memories, or simply in accordance with nature an accumulation of atoms that make up a body. In her sculpture Kure often employs bits of kitsch or commodified cuteness. These manufactured icons for Kure come in the form of Disney characters, stuffed animals and branded super-heroes. Fabricated, decidedly abstract bodies, these creatures exist in a simulacrum-world, acting as surrogates, they practice hope in a hopeless world.

Kure’s collage series, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, discusses discord head-on. The images are of a desperate place, one of confusion and disharmony. For Kure they mine a deep-rooted archive of unresolved issues. Yet in these watercolors memory and longing replace the absence of the body and the challenge becomes one of technique. White paint is applied on white paper, both extracting the image from the background and leaving a ghostly presence.

For Kure the powerlessness she feels regarding issues of political and social injustice are mitigated through the work, a visible struggle between beauty and chaos, the mind and the body. Descartes’ claim, “I think therefore I am” is turned on its head. Constantly negotiating oppositions and extremes, Kure creates juxtapositions to find balance if not resolution through abstraction.

Born in Nigeria, Marcia Kure’s work has appeared in museum and gallery exhibitions in Africa, Canada, Europe, Japan, United Arab Emirates and the United States. Most recently featured at the Dakar Biennale, Senegal; The Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City; and in the Paris Triennial at Palais de Tokyo. Her work will be exhibited next at WIELS Contemporary Art Center, Brussels in “Body Talk: Feminism, Sexuality and the Body in the Work of African Women Artists”. Reviews have appeared in the New York Times, The New Yorker, New York Observer, Time Out, Frieze, Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art, African Arts and Artforum among others.

The Gallery will publish a catalogue with an original text by Marcia Kure on the occasion of the exhibition.

The exhibition will be on view at the gallery located at 522 West 24 Street Tuesday to Saturday 10 AM to 6 PM. For additional information please contact Susan Inglett Gallery at 212/647- 9111, fax 212/647-9333 or info@inglettgallery.com

522 West 24 Street
New York NY 10011
T 212 647 9111
F 212 647 9333

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Penny Siopis Retrospective

Penny Siopis, Spell, 2007 Courtesy Michael Stevenson

Penny Siopis, Blow Up, 2010. Courtesy Michael Stevenson

The retrospective of one of my favorite artists Penny Siopis, "Time and Again," is ongoing at the South African National Gallery, Cape Town. I oh so wish I could see it before it closes. Even from this great distance, her "Pinky Pinky" and "Lasso" series still give you the shivers, their terrible beauty hard ignore; and the laboriously detailed surfaces of her Apartheid-era commentaries on the violence and decadence of racist-masculinist history/society, still make a strong argument for art's symbolic and critical power in the face of systemic injustice. This link to virtual views of the exhibition is the next best thing for those of us who can't make it Cape Town before March 23.